Monday, 28 September 2015

L'Homme Qui Ramassait Les Épingles 1968

This is a double page illustration from Plexus which accompanied an overview of L'Homme Qui Ramassait Les Épingles by Pierre Boulle, a short story by the author originally published as part of a collection of fictional work under the title Histories Charitable (1965), although he is probably best known for two of his earlier novels The Bridge over the River Kwai (1952) & The Planet of the Apes (1963). There is quite an amount of information about Boulle and his work online, much less so regarding the illustrator, i've searched but nothing definite has surfaced so far, unless i've somehow misread his signature, I'm pretty sure it's signed as Panos, but i've included a close-up for your perusal in the final scan the meantime i'll keep searching! 


                                         IMAGE CREDIT & LINKS
Image scanned by Sweet Jane from PLEXUS issue No. 12. 1968. Illustration by Panos (?) for an original story by Pierre Boulle. I have previously featured the work of many the Plexus illustrators, some of which you can view here & also here and via any of the associated labels at the end of these posts. Read about Pierre Boulle The French spy who wrote Planet of the Apes here. A review of The Bridge on the River Kwai (film adaptation) here. A complete history of Planet of the Apes here and finally a Pierre Boulle bibliography here.

Sunday, 20 September 2015

The Aubrey Beardsley Influence - Alan Parry 1967

I'm quite taken with this illustration by Alan Parry for RAVE, it was actually just part of a miniscule paragraph measuring around 2"x1¼'' on the editor's page announcing the 'Rave Of The Month' poster which was included in the december issue of the magazine that year as a pull-out Christmas present to the readers, but it caught my eye nonetheless so i've enlarged it to take a closer look...I think what drew me in was the very obvious Aubrey Beardsley influence, which was so prevalent around this time. The finished poster is an incredible full colour psychedelic version of the design, spread out over a double page, which I will scan in due course, but I think it works really well in basic black & white too. I also think that Alan Parry is fast becoming a favourite illustrator, he was a regular contributor to RAVE, as well as many other publications, but i've recently discovered that he also illustrated the Man About the House comic strip for Look-In, which has endeared him to me even more so.


                                                      IMAGE CREDIT & LINKS
Image scanned by Sweet Jane from RAVE magazine, December, 1967. Illustration by Alan Parry. Examples of Alan Parry's illustrations for the Man About the House comic-strip here & also here. View one of my previous posts featuring the artwork of Alan Parry here. And it would seem that i'm not the only fan of his The Aubrey Beardsley influence hereAnd finally watch Man About the House, Season 1 Episode 1, first screened on ITV 15th of August 1973 here.

Monday, 7 September 2015

Champion Advert 1970

Take a tip from AMA Grand National Champion Mert Lawwill - always ride with spark plugs made by Champion! Send for Champion's #1 Cycle Poster. It's 17'' x 22'' big. Printed in full color. And it's just $1.00.  CHAMPION #1, Department CP, P.O. Box 910, Toledo, Ohio 43601.

                                                       IMAGE CREDIT & LINKS
Image scanned from US CYCLE Magazine, October 1970 for the Sweet Jane blog with thanks to Brad Jones. Artist uncredited. Visit the official website of Mert Lawwill motorcycle racer here. Watch ON ANY SUNDAY the 1971 documentary on motorcycle racing featuring stars of the sport, including Mert Lawwill & film star Steve McQueen, a racer in his own right here.

Sunday, 30 August 2015

The Pop Market - A Raver's Guide to the Portobello Road Market 1966

It's just a narrow gulf of a street twisting down from the posh end at Notting Hill Gate - all antique shops and arty cottages - to the junk shops and vegetable stalls nearer Kensal Town. Nothing special during the week, you might think, but on Saturdays the joint is jumping! The Portobello Road is where ravers go to look for bargains, buy clothes, meet their friends and above all, to see and be seen. Early Saturday morning the dealers in antique clothes set up their stalls along the pavements, and the antique markets and arcades get out their stock: rows of swinging necklaces, cases of heavy rings, piles of plates and silverware, trays full of odd buttons and broken watches. By eleven o'clock it's crowded out, but not only with the trade dealers you might expect. Swinging London descends en masse into the hundred yards of narrow street to look for bargains.

It's getting to the decadent stage now. The French and Americans arrive by the taxi load to stand gawping at the capes, the scarlet jackets and the clashing mini-skirts. All just as they'd read in the Wisconsin Times or the Hooterville Gazette. Long-haired guitarists strum soulfully by the railings opposite Henekeys, one of the main pubs, and further down the street a young singer with a beard and no teeth collects money in a tattered old cap, while the swarms of photographers, who outnumber everyone else, shoot everyone that moves. Among the movers you might see Mick Jagger and Chrissie Shrimpton, or it might be John Lennon and Cynthia, or maybe The Who. There are very few pop stars who haven't bought stuff from the market.

''I Was Lord Kitchener's Valet'', purveyors of military and original Victorian gear, sells all manner of frills, furs and laces. Roger Daltrey of The Who bought some sailors white bell-bottoms there. Gary Farr of the T-Bones walked out with several American Navy tee shirts. Charlie Watts has bought jackets there and so have Ray Davies, Mick Jagger and John Lennon. But it is Eric Clapton of the Cream who is regarded as the real trend-setter, perhaps because he spends most time there. Fur coats go for five pounds down the Market. And jacket and capes go for two pounds or even thirty shillings. Long Victorian dresses vary in price from about a pound to three pounds. But in all cases, you'll get what you want cheaper if you bargain for it, and that applies especially to clothes more than jewellery. Rings and necklaces are more expensive, because their value doesn't decrease with age. Nevertheless, it's still cheaper than average, and probably the best selection of Victorian jewellery in London.

But the wildest gear is on the people; yellow coat and pink tie, silver stockings and swirling green cloak. So if you fancy joining in before it dies the unnatural death of all ''in'' places, here are a few facts about where to go, how to get there and what to look for....
FRIDAY. The junk market. A lot of real rubbish..odd china, old books and kitchen sinks. But some real finds in the way of pictures, records and the odd antique, if you have the patience to look. All day at Kensal Rise end.
SATURDAY. The antique market. Lovely antique rings and stones. Lots of period clothes, mainly nineteenth and early twentieth century, at any price from ten shillings to five pounds. Starts early morning and goes on until early evening.

Looks as though the girl above prefers antique jewellery - the market's speciality. Stones on sale tend to be onyx and agate rather than gold and diamonds, but if you fancy something more flashy, there are some fantastic copies of really old rings in very elaborate.

Wild satin shirt in gold, bound with red velvet - modelled by RAVE girl Lesley Garner - sells in ''I Was Lord Kitchener's Valet'' for thirty shillings. Clothes like this make you wonder who wore them in the first place. If half the stock is Army and Navy surplus then the other half must come from a theatrical costumier!

Detail from the illustrated map of Portobello Road by Alan Parry which accompanies the feature, be sure to click on the first image at the top of the page to view a close-up of the entire map.

Look down into the crowd at the Portobello Road Market and you might pick out someone like Eric Clapton of the Cream, seen above shopping for rings. Hasn't he got enough already?

                                                  Sailor jacket from I Was Lord Kitchener's Valet.

This couple have found what they were looking for - an American tunic at fifty shillings, and the miniest of Guard's tunics in lime green for four pounds. Victorian dresses like the one on the model can be bought at the market for anything from one to four pounds, but be careful - dresses like this show their age far more than heavy capes and jackets. Lace and feathers tend to decay with time, so inspect them before buying or your dress might fall to pieces the first time you put it on. Updated 2/9/2015: I've recently discovered the identity of the couple in this photograph, they are David Mainman and the artist Olivia Temple, you can visit Olivia's website here.

                                                                      IMAGE CREDITS
All original information & images scanned by Sweet Jane from RAVE  magazine December 1966. Original editorial by Lesley Garner, Photographs by Mark Sharratt, Portobello Road Market illustration by Alan Parry. 
                                            The history of Portobello Road can be found here.
Great photos by Simos Tsapnidis of the famous Pubs Henekeys and Finches on Portobello Road. London 1966 and 1967 & much more here.   Dennis Wilson & Al Jardine of The Beach Boys shopping on Portobello road, filmed in 1966 by Peter Whitehead. Edited to accompany the Spectrum's 1967 45 release, here. And the original promo film for the Spectrum's Portobello Road single here.

Sunday, 23 August 2015

Andre 1968

                                                    IMAGE CREDIT & LINKS
Image scanned for the Sweet Jane blog from Jours de France, 23 March, 1968 with thanks to Brad Jones. Discover the heritage of the Andre shoe company which was established by Albert Levy in 1900 here.

Wednesday, 19 August 2015

A & B GIRL 1964

Fashions and records...they've both got two sides. Here's the A side of fashion, flip the page and there's the B side...and Twelve steps To Loveliness.

'A' SIDE...A party-best dress for Halloween - or any other night of the year - in white net, dolled up with red velvet ribbon under the bustline, and long layered, see-through, sleeves. By Susan Small £12 1s 6d. The white satin little girl-look shoes are by Loftus, £2 19s 6d. and the ritzy bracelet comes from a range at Fenwicks of Bond Street, £1 5s.

'B' SIDE...How's this for contrast? But isn't it great! The suit, in grey flannel is just like a man's, pockets, trouser crease and all, and a half-belt across the back. But the price is girl-sized. It's £7 17s 6d. by Slimma. It's worn with over-the-ankle Chukka boots in brown suede by Saxone, £3 19s 11d. Right; 7 & 8 respectively His or her clothes? Both actually. The white-collar workers shirt is made by Her Tern in blue and white gingham. The cost £1 19s 6d. The second-skin trousers are made for men at His Clothes and cost £2 19s 6d. Heeps of girls are buying these trousers and having them shortened while they wait.

5 This is the only new dress shape since the shift. It's cut as simply as a child's smock, with long school-room sleeves. It's deceptively expensive though. Cost is £15 10s by Jane and Jane.

                                                                    IMAGE CREDITS
All images scanned by Sweet Jane from Rave and Hit Parade No.9 October 1964. Fashion notes by Penny Vincenzi, All photographs by Anthony Rawlinson.

                                         Some Classic Old Print Ads by  Sir Anthony Rawlinson here.

Saturday, 8 August 2015

Bata Shoe Advert 1970

                                                        IMAGE CREDIT & LINKS
Image scanned for the Sweet Jane blog from Elle Collections, 2 March, 1970 with thanks to Brad Jones. Artist uncredited. Discover the history behind the brand and much more on the excellent Bata Reminiscence and Resource Centre website here   Visit the Bata Shoe Museum here. View the Bata Museum's online exhibitions here & read an interview with Sonja Bata, founder of the Museum here.